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Cape Silver
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Royal Cape Golf Club 100 Centenary Silver Medallion - Lieutenant General Sir Henry D'Oyley Torrens KCB KCMG   
McCallum & Stevens, Cape 1985
$ 190.00

An interesting Royal Cape Golf Club silver commemorative medallion, celebrating it's 100 year anniversary in 1985. The obverse depicts 2 golfers with trees in the background, this is a faithful reproduction of the oldest known photograph showing golf being played in South Africa, which is owned by the Royal Cape Golf Club (see https://www.royalcapegolf.co.za/about). The medallion reads "LT. GEN SIR HENRY D'O TORRENS, FOUNDER OF THE CAPE GOLF CLUB, 14 NOV 1885, FIRST MONTHLY MEDAL, WATERLOO GREEN". The reverse has the logo of the Royal Cape Golf Club, with "100 CENTENARY 1885-1985". The medallion is hallmarked "SILVER", and has the number 115 stamped on the side. The medallion is perfectly preserved in it's original box, which reads "McCallum and Stevens Cape Town". The medallion is good quality and is also a good weight. Henry Torrens (1823-1889) was a British Army officer and Colonial Governor, he served in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers and was awarded the French Legion of Honour in the Crimean war. He served i...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johannes Combrink   
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 370.00

A Cape silver konfyt (preserve) fork in the Old English pattern, with 4 tines. The fork is good quality and is in excellent condition, with clear hallmarks. The fork has original owners engraved initials CB. The hallmarks consist of makers mark IC in between 2 castle devices (Welz mark 35, Cape Silver and Silversmiths). Johannes Combrink was born in the Cape in 1781, he married Aurelia Lotter in 1807 and died in 1853. He worked from Dorp Street.

Cape Silver Tablespoon, Unidentified Makers Mark ID
I.D, Cape C 1830
$ 260.00

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Fiddle pattern, with unascribed maker mark I.D. The spoon has original owners engraved initials, now worn, first letter probably A. The makers mark is very distinctive, I.D in serrated punch, between 2 five pointed stars. This mark is not described in any of the Cape silver textbooks. The reason for ascribing this maker to Cape is that 3 known examples have now appeared, and all were sourced in the Cape, hence the attribution. The first was posted in the WWW.925-1000 silver forum in 2012 by a Cape based South African dealer, where Dognose tentatively ascribed it to American silversmith Jabez Delano (1763-1848), see the post http://9251000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=31240. The photographs supplied have now been used on the ancestry website for Jabez Delano, in our view in error. A second tablespoon appeared on the website of South Africa's leading silver dealer, The Old Corkscrew, described as Cape but unascribed (we agree), item S373, www.theoldcorkscrew.co.za. This spoon is...

Cape Silver Tablespoon - Jan Lotter, Rare Hallmark
Jan Lotter, Cape 1813-1817
$ 220.00

A Cape silver tablespoon in the Old English pattern, with rare Cape hallmarks not shown by Welz in his book "Cape Silver and Silversmiths". The spoon has been well used, and has a small split (see condition description). The spoon has original owners initials CW engraved on it, the C is larger than the W, so probably done by the owner himself (overall quite quaint). The hallmarks consist of makers mark IL co-joined in oval punch, in between 2 "birds foot" devices, these marks are well struck and clear. The IL makers mark is mark 71 Welz, but the birds foot device is not recorded (Lotter also used a floral hallmark which is recorded). However, the birds foot device used by Lotter is recorded by Morrison (Silversmiths and Goldsmiths of the Cape of Good Hope, 1936, page 57, where this makers mark is pictured). A variant of this mark is also recorded by Heller (History of Cape Silver, 1949, page 151, mark MM40, which shows an extra arm to the birds foot). We can only assume this is a rare mark that was not seen b...

Cape Silver Teaspoons (Pair) - Lawrence Twentyman, Fiddle Pattern
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1837
$ 220.00

A lovely pair of Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, in excellent condition and with very clear hallmarks. The spoons are clearly hand made, you can see very slight differences in the shape and size of the Fiddle and bowl shape when comparing closely. The spoons are good quality and a good weight. The spoons have no engraving with no initials removed, completely original. Both spoons are clearly hallmarked with 4 pseudo hallmarks, all struck individually in the same order - pseudo duty mark, bird, pseudo Edinburgh Castle town mark and pseudo date letter B. This is mark 134 in the book "Cape Silver and Silversmiths" by Stephan Welz, without makers mark - but clearly Twentyman as he was the only Cape silversmith who used these punches. Twentyman was the most prolific of all Cape silversmiths, he had the first shop on Heerengracht (now Adderley Street) with a shop window. He worked between 1818 and 1837. We really like these spoons. Note - we have a matching set of 6 , S 11196.

Cape Silver Teaspoons (Set of 6) - Lawrence Twentyman, Fiddle Pattern
Lawrence Twentyman, Cape 1818-1837
$ 680.00

A lovely set of 6 Cape silver teaspoons in the Fiddle pattern, in excellent condition and with very clear hallmarks. The spoons are clearly hand made, you can see very slight differences in the shape and size of the Fiddle and bowl shape when comparing closely. The spoons are good quality and a good weight, just under 20 grammes each. The spoons have no engraving with no initials removed, completely original. All 6 spoons are clearly hallmarked with 4 pseudo hallmarks, all struck individually in the same order - pseudo duty mark, bird, pseudo Edinburgh Castle town mark and pseudo date letter B. This is mark 134 in the book "Cape Silver and Silversmiths" by Stephan Welz, without makers mark - but clearly Twentyman as he was the only Cape silversmith who used these punches. Twentyman was the most prolific of all Cape silversmiths, he had the first shop on Heerengracht (now Adderley Street) with a shop window. He worked between 1818 and 1837. We really like these spoons.

Rare Early Cape Silver 3 Pronged Hanoverian Pattern Fork - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt (2 of 2)
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape 1768-1811
$ 370.00

A rare early Cape Silver three pronged fork, in the Hanoverian pattern. The fork is a lovely shape, long and elegant, with long tines. The fork has makers mark DHS, with some wear but clearly visible, along with a bunch of grapes with vine leaves in a circular punch (mark 109 in Cape Silver by Welz). This fork also has a small Dutch ZII hallmark, for 835 purity, indicating the spoon was imported into the Netherlands at some stage. The fork also has a small owners cross hatch scratch mark next to the makers mark. Three pronged forks were common in the early 18th century, they were gradually replaced by 4 prongs after 1760, perhaps a little later in the colonies, but we believe this dates to the early part of Schmidt's career. Schmidt arrived in the Cape from Strelitz, Germany, as a soldier in 1768. He worked as a sword cutler for the Dutch East India Company, and became a burgher and silversmith in 1779. He died in 1811 (Cape Silver by Welz, pg 139). He is described by David Heller (in his book History of Cape...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Dominique Dumoulin
Dominique du Moulin, Cape 1818-1833
$ 370.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The fork is quite colonial in character, the tines have slightly different thicknesses, overall a little crude but clearly hand made. The fork has makers mark DBD between 2 five pointed stars (Welz mark 44), this is clearly struck with slight wear along the top. Dominique Baudouin Du Moulin worked between 1818 and 1833, he arrived in the Cape from Brabant (now Belgium) and married the sister of Cape silversmith Johannes Hendricus Beyleveld (Cape Silversmiths by Welz, page 131.). His work is only found occasionally.

Rare Early Cape Silver Hanoverian Pattern Spoon - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape 1768-1811
$ 370.00

A rare early Cape Silver spoon, in the Hanoverian pattern. The spoon is a lovely shape, long and elegant. The spoon has makers mark DHS, with some wear but clearly visible, along with a bunch of grapes with vine leaves in a circular punch (mark 109 in Cape Silver by Welz). The spoon also has a small Dutch ZII hallmark, for 835 purity, indicating the spoon was imported into the Netherlands at some stage. The spoon also has a small owners cross hatch scratch mark next to the makers mark. Schmidt arrived in the Cape from Strelitz, Germany, as a soldier in 1768. He worked as a sword cutler for the Dutch East India Company, and became a burgher and silversmith in 1779. He died in 1811 (Cape Silver by Welz, pg 139). He is described by David Heller (in his book History of Cape Silver) as the "greatest Cape silversmith". Heller goes so far to describe Schmidt as a "master craftsman, whose work can be compared to Paul Storr" (History of Cape Silver, pg 79). Note - we have two matching forks, S 11124 and S11125.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt   
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape C 1780
$ 370.00

A Charming Cape silver Konfyt (preserve) fork, in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork has a large oval drop, which along with 3 tines (later forks had 4 tines), shows it's age. The fork has makers mark only, quite clear, it appears to be HNS, this is mark 175 in Welz, Cape Silver. This mark is recorded as "unknown" by Welz, but is now thought to be a worn punch used by Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, the greatest of all the Cape Silversmiths (Heller and Welz) - see the similarity with Schmidt's DHS mark, Welz mark 110.

Rovos Rail Sterling Silver Steam Train Spoons (Pair)
Cape Mint, Cape 1986
$ 250.00

A pair of lovely steam train sterling silver spoons, depicting the Rovos Rail steam train and wagons of Southern Africa. The spoons have good detail, and show steam train, caol wagon, water wagon and passenger compartment. The passenger wagon has engraved initials RVR for Rovos Rail (see www.rovos.com), the spoons have teaspoon sixed bowls but the handles are longer. The handles are cast silver and pierced. Both spoons are hallmarked with makers mark "C.M" for Cape Mint, and also "SIL" for sterling silver. We assume the spoons were made to commemorate the opening of Rovos Rail in 1986. Rovos Rail is a luxury rail service operating in Southern Africa, the Pride of Africa has been described as the "most luxurious train in the world".

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepel - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814
$ 600.00

A Cape Silver lemoen lepel, (orange spoon), in good condition, and with very clear makers mark. This spoon is typical of the Cape lemoen lepels, with pointed terminal and bowl, the bowl itself eye shaped and quite deep. The spoon has typical Cape engraving, with a 4 petal flower and wrigglework along the edges of the handles. It also has a distinctive V joint connecting handle to bowl. The spoon has a slight copper tinge, this is exaggerated in the photographs. The IC makers mark is well struck and clear (Welz mark 32 with canted corners). Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). As far as we are aware, only Jan Lotter and Johannes combrink made lemoen lepels, probably between 1800 and 1815. Note - this spoon matches the pair S 1922 and single S 1923.

Rare Early Cape Silver 3 Pronged Hanoverian Pattern Fork - Daniel Heinrich Schmidt (1 of 2)
Daniel Heinrich Schmidt, Cape 1768-1811
$ 370.00

A rare early Cape Silver three pronged fork, in the Hanoverian pattern. The fork is a lovely shape, long and elegant, with long tines. The fork has makers mark DHS, with some wear but clearly visible, along with a bunch of grapes with vine leaves in a circular punch (mark 109 in Cape Silver by Welz). The fork also has a small owners cross hatch scratch mark next to the makers mark. Three pronged forks were common in the early 18th century, they were gradually replaced by 4 prongs after 1760, perhaps a little later in the colonies, but we believe this dates to the early part of Schmidt's career. Schmidt arrived in the Cape from Strelitz, Germany, as a soldier in 1768. He worked as a sword cutler for the Dutch East India Company, and became a burgher and silversmith in 1779. He died in 1811 (Cape Silver by Welz, pg 139). He is described by David Heller (in his book History of Cape Silver) as the "greatest Cape silversmith". Heller goes so far to describe Schmidt as a "master craftsman, whose work can be compare...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johann Voight
Johann Voight, Cape C 1791
$ 450.00

A delightful Cape silver konfyt fork, one of the most charming we have seen. The fork is in the Hanoverian pattern, with turn up end, it has a form of feather edge engraving at the top of the handle, a long elegant stem (much longer than usual), and 3 tines. It has a v shaped drop, so overall quite different from many Cape silver konfyt forks. The fork is struck with makers mark IVC, this has no dots, the mark is clearly visible but the punch appears a little worn (hence the G being seen as a C). We believe this to be one of the marks used by Johann Voight, it is depicted in David Heller's book "History of Cape Silver", page 163. We have now confirmed 3 different IVG marks on Cape silver, which clearly come from 3 different punches, but probably come from 1 silversmith, or family of silversmiths as sons often took over the business of the father, and used the same punches. The other two IVG marks have different configurations of dots present, see Welz mark 171 with 2 dots, Welz described this maker as "unknow...

Cape Silver Lemoen Lepel - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape C 1814
$ 740.00

A Cape Silver lemoen lepel, (orange spoon), in very good condition, and with very clear makers mark. This spoon is typical of the Cape lemoen lepels, with pointed terminal and bowl, the bowl itself eye shaped and quite deep. The spoon has typical Cape engraving, with a 4 petal flower and wrigglework along the edges of the handles. It also has a distinctive V joint connecting handle to bowl. The IC makers mark is well struck and clear (Welz mark 32 with canted corners). Welz describes orange spoons as"probably the most attractive type of spoon made at the Cape, derived from Dutch spoons", pg 95. He also notes that all known examples are by Cape born silversmiths of the early 19th century (so not made by the more prolific English immigrants who arrived after 1815). As far as we are aware, only Jan Lotter and Johannes combrink made lemoen lepels, probably between 1800 and 1815. Note - this spoon matches the pair S 1922.

Early Cape Silver Snuff Box - Marthinus Lourens Smith
Martinus Lourens Smith, Cape 1757-1782
$ 1 550.00

A fabulous quality Cape silver snuff box, in excellent condition, it has not seen much use (many Cape silver snuff boxes are worn from regular use). The box is rectangular, it has a lovely thumbpiece, similar in shape to a Cape Dutch gable. The engraving is typically Cape, with foliate and wrigglework borders, and stippling on the sides and base. The central cartouche is vacant, it has never been engraved with initials, which might explain its well preserved condition. The interior is gilded, and the original gilding is also extremely well preserved. The interior lid corner has a scratch cross, probably a mark of ownership. The hallmarks are also excellent, Welz mark 116, makers initials MLS set between 3 crown devices. Smith was a Dane who arrived in the Cape in 1757 age 35, so we assume already trained as a silversmith (his work is always good quality). He lived a long live, married 4 times, and had 10 children, he died in 1806 age 84.

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork - Johannes Casparus Lotter
Johannes Casparus Lotter, Cape 1811-1823
$ 280.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Old English pattern, with 3 tines. The fork has engraved original owners initials MMR, quite quaintly engraved, possibly by an amateur. The makers mark is very well struck and very clear, makers initials ICL between 2 floral devices with 7 petals (Welz mark 78, page 150). Lotter worked at the Cape between 1811 and his death in 1823, he shared a name with his father Johannes Casparus Lotter, who was also a silversmith (12 members of the Lotter family practised as silversmiths).

Cape Silver Tableforks (Set of 5) - Willem Lotter
Willem Godfried Lotter, Cape 1810-1835
$ 740.00

A set of 5 Fiddle pattern Cape silver tableforks, made by Willem Lotter. The forks are quite long and elegant, with bevelled edges, quite attractive and pleasing quality. All 5 forks are struck with makers mark WGL in irregular punch between 2 oval devices (Welz mark 88). Welz depicts this mark as a face, we are not convinced, this requires further research. Willem Gotfried Lotter worked between 1810 and 1835, his father (also Willem Gotfried) was also a silversmith, they shared the same punches. Lotter died in Richmond, which was established as a spa town for sufferers of tuberculosis.

Cape Silver Tablespoons (Set of 6) - Johannes Combrink
Johannes Combrink, Cape 1814-1853
$ 900.00

A set of 6 Old English pattern Cape silver tablespoons, made by Johannes Combrink. All 6 spoons have engraved owners initials G, we assume the original owner. This set has been made by hand, there are slight differences in length, also differences in the shape of the handle, with some having narrower ends. One spoon also has a noticeably larger bowl than the other 5, so perhaps made at a different time. The drop on 2 spoons is also slightly longer, overall interesting but subtle differences between the spoons. The hallmarks also exhibit differences, three spoons are struck with makers mark IC three times, the other three are struck with makers mark IC four times (similar to the English duty dodgers). The orientation of the marks also differs, some are struck vertically and some sideways, so it appears the silversmith struck marks quite randomly. This mark is 29 or mark 30 in the book Cape Silver by Welz, the C is quite close the the I, and has short arms, almost looks like a K. The slightly larger spoon, whic...

Cape Silver Konfyt Fork -Johan Anton Bunning
Johan Anton Bunning?, Cape C 1800
$ 330.00

A Cape silver konfyt fork in the Fiddle pattern, with 3 tines. The tines are different from most konfyt forks, these are quite fat, widely spaced and short (3.3. cm). The fork has original owners initials TFM, the engraving in an unusual script, quite pleasing overall. The fork has makers mark I.B in oval punch, with the I and B co-joined. This is depicted in the book "Cape Silver and Silversmiths" by Stephan Welz as mark 20, page 146, for Johan Anton Bunning, a German soldier who arrived in the Cape in 1758 and died in 1793. He mark is confirmed as he made silver for the Dutch Reformed Church, whose records confirm him as maker, but the Fiddle pattern style of the fork is problematic, as it was only introduced circa 1800, so it is unlikely he made this fork. A number of alternatives exist, it could have been made by a son (Cape silversmiths regularly carried on using punches created by fathers). More likely is that this is the mark of another Cape silversmith, whose mark has not yet been attributed. IB or JB...

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